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Star Filter.

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Falling down an internet rabbithole of Brian Eno trivia, came across this jem.  ”as if a foreign diplomat, surveying the windfall of his own radiating unconscious.”

unbornwhiskey:

youngmanhattanite:

“To be honest, I can’t remember. It would have been treatments of some kind. I would take existing instruments and feed them through various devices to ‘weird them up.’ It wasn’t something people were commonly doing then. Nobody does anything else now…”

Andrew and I talked yesterday about how, in interviews, Eno regards the rest of the human race with a sort of distant anthropology, as if a foreign diplomat, surveying the windfall of his own radiating unconscious.

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Finally finding time to listen to this amazing album. Purchasing now.

(Source: Spotify)

Tags: music spotify
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Anybody else remember this one. So much gratuitous boobie for a cartoon.

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Years ago a friend of mine gave me this song on a mix CD but it’s kind of a shitty burn with no bass and so the song goes: “We like the cars that go: silence”

(Source: youtube.com)

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Mary J. Blige - I’m Goin’ Down (by MaryJBligeVEVO)

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museumgifs:

Glenn Ligon (b. 1960, Bronx, NY)Give us a Poem (Palindrome #2), 2007Gift of the Artist

After a speech by Muhammad Ali at Harvard University in 1975, a student asked Ali to give the audience a poem, Ali replied, “me, we.” As a star athlete and celebrated spokesman for political awareness in the black community and beyond, Ali imbued those two words with poetic and political meaning that resonated long after the crowd dissipated. Arguably one of the shortest poems ever recited, “me, we” highlighted the intimate relationship between the individual and the community. Here, Ali’s poignant verse is commemorated in a neon installation by Glenn Ligon. Give us a Poem introduces us to Ligon’s Characteristic appropriation of provocative texts and visuals that engage the viewer or spectator in both historical and current discourses on identity and contemporary art.

museumgifs:

Glenn Ligon (b. 1960, Bronx, NY)
Give us a Poem (Palindrome #2), 2007
Gift of the Artist

After a speech by Muhammad Ali at Harvard University in 1975, a student asked Ali to give the audience a poem, Ali replied, “me, we.” As a star athlete and celebrated spokesman for political awareness in the black community and beyond, Ali imbued those two words with poetic and political meaning that resonated long after the crowd dissipated. Arguably one of the shortest poems ever recited, “me, we” highlighted the intimate relationship between the individual and the community. Here, Ali’s poignant verse is commemorated in a neon installation by Glenn Ligon. Give us a Poem introduces us to Ligon’s Characteristic appropriation of provocative texts and visuals that engage the viewer or spectator in both historical and current discourses on identity and contemporary art.

(via creativetime)